MISSION STATEMENT

Each member of the Board of Trustees for the Township of Taymouth, Saginaw County, Michigan has taken an Oath to uphold and support the Constitution of the United States and the Constitution of Michigan. To this end, we the Township Board, shall work to preserve and enhance the Township’s rural character, minimize increased tax burdens while maintaining public safety, zoning administration, providing reliable services, public improvements, and the maintenance of all Township property for the residents of Taymouth Township, Saginaw County, Michigan.

History

Taymouth Township, Michigan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Taymouth Township, Michigan
Township
Location within Saginaw County, Michigan
Location within Saginaw County, Michigan
Coordinates: 43°16′1″N 83°51′52″WCoordinates: 43°16′1″N 83°51′52″W
Country United States
State Michigan
County Saginaw
Area
 • Total 35.7 sq mi (92.4 km2)
 • Land 35.6 sq mi (92.1 km2)
 • Water 0.1 sq mi (0.3 km2)
Elevation 614 ft (187 m)
Population (2000)
 • Total 4,624
 • Density 130.0/sq mi (50.2/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
FIPS code 26-79100[1]
GNIS feature ID 1627154[2]

Taymouth Township is a civil township of Saginaw County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 4,624 at the 2000 census.

Communities

  • Burt is an unincorporated community in the township and is a census-designated place (CDP) for statistical purposes.
  • Fosters is an unincorporated community in the township between the two segments of Busch Road west of Huron & Eastern Railway and Dorwood Road, basically consisting of Saginaw Street, Fosters Road, Railroad Street, Hasting Street and Washington Street.[3][4]
  • Morseville is an unincorporated community in the township at Morseville and Burt Roads.[3][5] The Morseville Bridge over the Flint River is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[6]
  • Taymouth is an unincorporated community in the township at 43°14′34″N 83°52′26″W on Seymour Road between Birch Run and Burt Roads.[7] A post office operated here from January 18, 1858 until June 30, 1903.[8]

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township has a total area of 35.7 square miles (92 km2), of which 35.6 square miles (92 km2) is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2) (0.34%) is water.

Demographics

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 4,624 people, 1,583 households, and 1,296 families residing in the township. The population density was 130.0 per square mile (50.2/km²). There were 1,661 housing units at an average density of 46.7 per square mile (18.0/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 95.61% White, 0.65% African American, 0.67% Native American, 0.19% Asian, 0.13% Pacific Islander, 0.82% from other races, and 1.92% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.44% of the population.

There were 1,583 households out of which 39.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.8% were married couples living together, 9.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 18.1% were non-families. 14.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.90 and the average family size was 3.20.

In the township the population was spread out with 28.2% under the age of 18, 8.5% from 18 to 24, 30.5% from 25 to 44, 24.8% from 45 to 64, and 8.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 102.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.6 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $46,581, and the median income for a family was $51,420. Males had a median income of $41,696 versus $22,458 for females. The per capita income for the township was $18,054. About 6.4% of families and 9.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.7% of those under age 18 and 4.9% of those age 65 or over.